NameElizabeth ALT, 2975
Birth6 Dec 1920
Death22 May 2006 Age: 85
MotherUNNAMED , 16262
Misc. Notes
Riegelsville, PA -- Elizabeth “Liz” Laidman Hill, died, surrounded by family, May 22, 2006. Born on June 12, 1920, in Buffalo, New York, Liz graduated from Cornell University after which she married her first husband, artist Hugh Laidman and literally designed and built a home and studio in East Aurora, New York. The early 60's brought Hugh and Liz to New Hope, PA, where they enjoyed 5 years living by the Delaware River. They returned to their home in East Aurora in 1965 where they lived until Hugh's death in 1987. A career as a sculptor, photographer and teacher were interrupted by the willing obligations to motherhood and homemaker. Her second marriage to John B. Hill, Jr. took her to Homosassa, Florida until John's death in 1998, after which she moved to Riegelsville, PA.
Surviving are her three daughters, Anita Wagenvoord of Riegelsville, PA, Cecily Laidman of New Hope, PA., Stephanie Tade and her husband Phillip of Riegelsville, PA. and pre-deceased by her daughter, Jennifer Laidman Myers; five grandchildren, Brendon Myers, Dana Craver, Alex, Sam and Madeline Tade. Also surviving are three step-sons, Steven Hill of West Falls, New York, Douglas Hill of Harrisburg, PA, and Richard Hill of Monrovia, California. Surviving, too, is her 93 year old sister, Marion Pinkow, of Grand Island, New York.
Memorial services were held at the home of her daughter, Anita, in Riegelsville, PA. Memorials may be made by planting a tree, calling a friend you haven't talked to in a long time and telling your loved ones how much they mean to you.
Submitted by Cecily Anne Laidman
Spouses
Birth8 Aug 1913
DeathMay 1987, South Wales, Erie County, NY, USA
OccupationArtist
FatherHerbert Cecil LAIDMAN , 10243 (1890-1973)
MotherMargaret REID , 10244 (ca1887-)
Misc. Notes
“Wrote books on drawing and painting, in the National Gallery, had done a syndicated cartoon strip back in the 70’s”

Mark O’Brien has this person as “Herbert Hugh Laidman” as listed in Herbert Edmund Laidman’s (10235) family bible

Found on: http://rwebs.net/avhistory/wwiiart.htm:
While serving with a Marine aviation unit on Guadalcanal, this thirty-year-old New Yorker, contracted chronic malaria and spent long periods in the hospital. In spite of this, he managed to send back more than sixty watercolors and dozens of pencil and wash drawings. Many of them were exhibited at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. and at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. At present he is in charge of the art department in the Marine Corps Public Relations Bureau, at Washington, D.C.
Night - Henderson Field
Watercolor, page 184
by T/Sgt. Herbert H. Laidman, USMC

AND

from: http://history.sandiego.edu/gen/st/~pkaplan/
Technical Sergeant Herbert H. Laidman [sic, for Hugh Herbert] sketched Marine life in the battle arena of the Southwest Pacific from a close and personal perspective. His artistic talents allowed him to receive a place as Combat Correspondent with a Marine Aircraft Wing.

AND

from: http://www.meibohmfinearts.com/artists.aspx?ID=62
Hugh Laidman (American, 1914-1987) Western New York artist, freelance illustrator, muralist, teacher, and author is nationally and internationally known for his versatility. He is regarded as an accomplished commercial artist, portrait painter, figure & landscape artist, and animal illustrator. His witty syndicated comic strip “Middle Class Animals” appeared in over 100 newspapers in the United States, Canada, throughout Europe and in South Africa from 1970-72. He began his professional career when he was fourteen and from then on mastered working in all types graphic media. He authored & illustrated several how-to books on drawing and painting, and was a consultant to the art departments of various universities. He maintained studios in New York City, New Hope, PA, and East Aurora, NY.

Born in New York City, Hugh was raised and went to high school in Niagara Falls, NY and later graduated from the Pratt Institute in 1937. While there he won awards, honors and scholarships and was commissioned to paint two murals. After graduation, he became an art director and freelance illustrator. He was a partner in Van Valkenburg Associates and subsequently became art director and vice president of James J. McMahon Advertising, both in New York City, until the outbreak of World War II.

In 1942, he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps (USMC) and served as a combat artist in the South Pacific, chronicling the battles throughout the Pacific Theater of Operations. The muster rolls of Headquarters for the USMC list Hugh as the first combat correspondent to report. Hugh was head of the USMC art program as Officer in Charge and along with fellow Marines Elmer Wexler and Vic Donohue, were the first three artists to go into combat at Guadalcanal during WWII. They produced many sketches of that long and difficult battle. As a result, he received a battlefield commission and also contracted malaria, but still managed to produce numerous sketches of the battle and various military exercises.

Following the war in 1945, Hugh and his wife Betty moved to East Aurora, NY, and the two collaborated on new book and art projects. Hugh built their home and art studio from the timbers of an old Grand Island, NY carriage house. The Laidman’s stayed in the Western New York area raising three daughters; Anita, Cecily and Stephanie.

In the early 1960’s, Hugh was chosen by the National Gallery of Art to record his impressions for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). In the early days of the NASA space program (1963-69), Hugh was among a group of selected artists, including such luminaries as Norman Rockwell, Paul Sample and James Wyeth, who were chosen to illustrate the Apollo missions. His work for NASA also included paintings for the original launches of the early manned space probes, the push for the moon and the earliest training of space shuttle crews. His work was included in NASA’s exhibition “Eyewitness to Space” and the book of the same title in 1971. Hugh also went on to become president of “Creative Projects” for Creative Notebook, Inc., a problem-solving publication for college administrators.

Author of several how-to books on drawing for beginners, intermediate and advanced artists, Hugh established himself as one of the leading authorities on art and drawing. Many of his books were published in foreign language editions, sold worldwide and some are still in publication: How to Build Your Own House (1950); How to Make Abstract Paintings (1961); The Complete Book of Drawing and Painting (1974); Animals: How to Draw Them (1975); Figures/Faces: A Sketcher's Handbook (1979); and Drawing Animals (1979).

“The base of creativity is knowledge.” Hugh said, “An outsider usually considers the art world a hotbed of creativity although in reality it is frequently a deathbed of imitation. Knowledge of the basic tools and materials, plus at least an acquaintance with their potential, is a small step in the right direction. Knowledge of the tools and materials in relation one to the next is a giant step. Most artists feel more at home in one medium. The simple fact is that an ability to work in one medium serves to reinforce an artist’s capabilities in the next one in which he chooses to experiment‚Ķwith the hope that lifting any mystery that surrounds a given process might remove the fear that is evidenced by so many specialists. A fundamental in the entire process of the artist is a knowledge of drawing. To distort effectively, the artist must first know how to draw correctly.”

Hugh exhibited in many museums and galleries here and abroad. His work was featured on the covers of various national magazines and publications. He did several covers and ads for Colliers Magazine, a cartoon series for The New Yorker magazine, and numerous illustrations for Hearst Publications. He did commissions for many different companies large and small for such organizations as; Marine Midland Bank, Buffalo, NY; Erie County Savings Bank and the Buffalo Savings Bank, Buffalo, NY; Allied Chemical Corporation, Buffalo, NY; Thiokol Chemical Company (now known as ATK launch Systems Group), Standard Oil of New Jersey, NJ; and Sun Oil (now Sunoco), Philadelphia, PA. He had paintings that hung in the Ford’s Exhibit at the 1964 New York World’s Fair and the Iranian Pavilion at the 1967 International and Universal Exposition (Expo 67) in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. One painting from the Expo 67 later hung in the palace of the Shah. His works are in many museums and private collections in the U.S., England, New Zealand, Australia, the East Indies and Japan.

Hugh worked in all media including, but not limited to oil, acrylic, watercolor, pencil, pen & ink, marker, charcoal, crayon, conte & litho sticks, pastel, casein gouache, scratchboard, and brush & ink.

Timeline:

1914- Born, New York City, NY.

1937- Graduated from the School of Illustration, Pratt Institute, NYC.

C1937-42- He was a partner in Van Valkenburg Associates and subsequently became art director and vice president of James J. McMahon Advertising, both in NYC.

1942- Served in the United States Marine Corps (USMC) as a combat artist in the South Pacific, chronicling the battles throughout the Pacific Theater of Operations. He received a battlefield commission for his service.

1945- Hugh and his wife Betty moved to East Aurora, NY, and built their home.

1950- He authored and illustrated the book How to Build Your Own House.

1961- He authored and illustrated the book How to Make Abstract Paintings.

1963-69- He worked for NASA in the early days of the space program, and was among a group of select well known artists, including Norman Rockwell and James Wyeth, who were chosen to illustrate the Apollo missions. His work for NASA also included paintings for the original launches of the early manned space probes, the push for the moon and the earliest training of space shuttle crews.

1964- Exhibited paintings in the 1964 New York World’s Fair, in the Ford’s Exhibit, NYC.

1967- Exhibited paintings in the 1967 International and Universal Exposition (Expo 67), in the Iranian Pavilion, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

1971- Works of Hugh’s were included in the NASA exhibition “Eyewitness to Space” and the book of the same title.

1970-72- His syndicated comic strip “Middle Class Animals” ran nationally and internationally in over 100 newspapers in the United States, Canada, throughout Europe and in South Africa.

1974- He authored and illustrated his best known book The Complete Book of Drawing and Painting.

c1974- Won 2nd prize in the Chamber of Commerce-AAO “Buffalo Scene I” competition, Buffalo, NY.

1975- He authored and illustrated the book Animals: How to Draw Them.

1979- He authored and illustrated the book Figures/Faces: A Sketcher's Handbook and the book Drawing Animals.

1984- The Smithsonian honored Hugh with two entries into their National Air and Space juried exhibition, the “Golden Age of Flight”, and one painting from the exhibit of the same name was chosen for the museum’s 1986 calendar, Washington, DC.

1986- Exhibited, select drawings & paintings, at Meibohm Fine Arts, Inc., East Aurora, NY. Received an honorary doctorate of Humane Letters from Canisius College, Buffalo, NY.

1987- Died, May 31, at the age of 73 in Millard Fillmore Hospital, Buffalo, NY after a long illness.

Exhibited also at: The Museum of Modern Art, NYC; The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, MN; the National Gallery, London, England; The Burchfield Art Center (now the Burchfield-Penney Art Center), Buffalo, NY, and many others.

Honors & Prizes: The Smithsonian honored Hugh with two entries into their National Air and Space juried exhibition, the “Golden Age of Flight” in 1984, featuring 400 artists. Both works were chosen for the final 25 painting exhibit, and one painting from the exhibit of the same name was chosen for the museum’s calendar for1986 and featured a Ford trimotor airliner from the 1920’s, flying sight-seers over Niagara Falls. The other painting was of the world-record aviator Wiley Post, downed in Siberia with his monoplane “Winnie Mae” (both in the Smithsonian Museum’s permanent collection), Washington, DC; 2nd Prize in the Chamber of Commerce-AAO “Buffalo Scene I” competition, c1974, Buffalo, NY; He won several awards, honors and scholarships while he studied at the Pratt Institute, NYC; He received a battlefield commission for his service in WWII.

Permanent displays: The painting “Steel Belief” is one of many, in the National Gallery of Art Collection, Washington, DC; A 168 foot mural featuring 222 years of history, Bethlehem, PA (exact location unknown); several murals depicting activities of the Iroquois Indian Confederacy, Tower Hall (now the Kimball Tower), University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY; “Golden Age of Flight” and “Winnie Mae” paintings are in the permanent collection, Smithsonian Museum, Washington, DC; Hugh donated several watercolors and sketches to Canisius College, Buffalo, NY.

(Rewritten & compiled chronologically by Mark Strong of Meibohm Fine Arts, Inc., East Aurora, NY, March/2008. Sources: Our internal records; Semper Fi: The Definitive Illustrated History of the U.S. Marines, by H. Avery Chenoweth, Brooke Nihart, 2005; The Complete Book of Drawing and Painting, by Hugh Laidman, 1974; Figures/Faces: A Sketcher's Handbook, by Hugh Laidman, 1979; The Buffalo News, article “Smithsonian Honors Artist Laidman”, Nov. 4th, 1985; The Buffalo News, obituaries, June 1, 1987; Canisius College “Citation for the Conferral of the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Humane Letters upon Hugh Laidman”, James M. Demske, S.J. President of Canisius College, 1986; The Buffalo-Currier Express, article “New Art Book Is Inspiring”, by Anne McIlhenney Matthews, artist quote, Jan., 1974; The Buffalo-Currier Express, article “For Tyro Artist”, by Nancy Tobin Willig, circa May, 1974; The Buffalo Evening News, article, “‘How-to’ for artists”, 1974; The Buffalo-Courrier Express, article “WNY Artist’s New Book Tells How to Draw Animals”, by Joan E. Given, Nov. 23, 1975)
Death1998
Last Modified 3 Jun 2006Created 3 Jun 2012 using Reunion for Macintosh