NameJoseph LAIDMAN, 3470, M1911
Birth9 Jun 1769, London, LND
Birth MemoSt Giles Cripplegate
Baptism25 Jun 1769, London, LND Age: <1
Bapt MemoSt Giles Cripplegate. S Leonard Laidman Carver & Tabitha. Born 9 June
Occupation1792 Mathematical instrument maker
FatherLeonard LAIDMAN of London , 3466, L1907 (ca1734-)
MotherTabitha SERGEANT , 3467
Misc. Notes
St Giles Cripplegate parish register reads: Joseph S Leonard Laidman Carver & Tabitha. born 9 June bap 25 Jun 1769.

National Archives (Kew) Website:
HO47/15/36  Covering Date 18 June 1792
Report of John William Rose, Recorder of London, on 1 individual petition (prisoner) on behalf of Joseph Laidman, mathematical instrument maker, convicted at the Old Bailey in March 1792, for a highway robbery and taking a silver watch, value £4:1:8, property of Thomas Bartlett.

The King on the Prosecution
Of Thomas Bartlett
Middlesex Agst
Joseph Laidman

James Galloway of New Street in the parish of Saint Dunstans in the West London Mathematical Instrument Maker Maketh Oath and saith That he has known Joseph Laidman late of Islington but now a prisoner in Newgate from his Infancy and saith That the said Joseph Laidman had a virtuous Education ^from his Father^ who was a Cabinet Maker in the employment of Mr Siddons Aldersgate Street and brought up a large Family with great Credit and the said Joseph Laidman hath always conducted himself with the greatest Credit honesty and Sobriety and been reputed a Sober Industrious youngman often Intrusted with property which he Punctually Accounted for and this Deponent would again Trust and employ the said Joseph Laidman if he was at Liberty

Sworn at my ) James Galloway
House in Clerkenwell Green )
The 21st day of May 1792 )
Before me )
Chas. Triquet

*****

The King on the Prosecution
Of Thomas Bartlett
Middlesex Agst
Joseph Laidman

James Galloway of New Street in the parish of Saint Dunstans in the West London Mathematical Instrument Maker Maketh Oath and saith That he has known Joseph Laidman late of Islington but now a prisoner in Newgate from his Infancy and saith That the said Joseph Laidman had a virtuous Education ^from his Father^ who was a Cabinet Maker in the employment of Mr Siddons Aldersgate Street and brought up a large Family with great Credit and the said Joseph Laidman hath always conducted himself with the greatest Credit honesty and Sobriety and been reputed a Sober Industrious youngman often Intrusted with property which he Punctually Accounted for and this Deponent would again Trust and employ the said Joseph Laidman if he was at Liberty

Sworn at my ) James Galloway
House in Clerkenwell Green )
The 21st day of May 1792 )
Before me )
Chas. Triquet

*****

Middlesex

Henry Howard of Tottenham Court Road in the parish of Saint Pancras Buckle maker Maketh Oath and saith That he hath known the Prosecutor an African Black who calls himselThomas Bartlett from his having been in the service of a Mr Bartlett deceased and afterwards for a short time with a Captain Bartlett late of Gower Street Bedford square who is now abroad And this Deponent further saith that the said Thomas Bartlett was about Seven years ago dismissed from the service of Captain Bartlett for Drunkeness or some other Misconduct and has not to the knowledge of this Deponent ever been employed by any Gentleman since but this Deponent has frequently seen the said Thomas Bartlett within this Six months in great Poverty and want and this Deponent has been informed by the said Thomas Bartlett that he was out of place and very Poor and owed his whole support to a woman of the Town whom he lived with in about in [?Marden] Lane in the Strand
Sworn at my House in ) H. Howard
Clerkenwell Green the )
22d day of May 1792 )
Before me Chas Triquet

*****

Middlesex

Thomas Spencer of Tottenham Court Road in the parish of Saint Pancras in the County of Middlesex Gentleman Maketh Oath and saith That they hath known Joseph Laidman late of Islington (but now a prisoner in Newgate) from his Infancy and saith that the said Joseph Laidman had a virtuous Education from his Father who was a Cabinet Maker in the employment of Mr Siddons Aldersgate Street and brought up a large Family with great Credit honesty and Sobriety and been reputed a SoberIndustrious Young man often Intrusted with Property which he Punctually Accounted for and this Deponent would again Credit him and employ him if he was at Liberty.
Sworn at my House ) Thos. Spencer
In Clerkenwell Green )
The 22d day of May )
1792 Before me )
Chas Triquet

*****

Serjts. Inn Flt. Strt. 18th. June 92

Sir/

In obedience to his Majesty's Commands which you have done me the honor to signify to me, I have taken into consideration the Case of Joseph Laidman tried in March Session last, for robbing Thomas Bartlett in the King's Highway of a Silver Watch value £4"1"8 his property

Thos. Bartlett, a Black, swore, he was coming along Pall Mall, and staid to see the Welch People come by, he wanted to get out of the way, and that Chap there, two more besides himself _ Prisoner caught hold of him and shoved him against the door, when he found him standing by him, He took out his Watch directly, the other Men were behind; he quite involved him, and looked him in the face, and pulled out his Watch; he caught hold of him directly and kept him; then all three began beating him, and almost broke his Jaw. He cried out and Prisoner was taken.

Joseph Creedland, swore, he saw the Prisoner striking Bartlett.
Guilty.

I am, of Opinion that confirmed as the Prosecutor is, by the Evidence on the Prosecution, which I have stated very shortly because the Case has already been Reported to his Majesty, he deserved the Credit of the Jury – The best account I can get of the habits of Life and conduct of the Prisoner by no means corresponds with the Voluntary Affidavits ^ made in the Prisoner's favor, Affidavits upon wch. no reliance can be [?placed] ^ which subject the Parties to no Punishment, if they should hazard to swear what is false.
I see no reason to recommend the Prisoner to any further extention of Mercy all which I submit to His Majesty's Wisdom.
And am with Respect
Sir,
Your most obedt.
hble Servt.
[signature illegible]

The Rt. Honble Henry Dundas/

*****

To the Right Honorable Henry Dundas
One of his Majesties Principal Secretaries of State.

The Humble Petition of Joseph Laidman late of Islington in the County of Middlesex Mathematical Instrument Maker, now a Prisoner in Newgate

Sheweth
That Your Petitioner is now of the Age of Twenty Two and was brought up to the Business of a Mathematical Instrument maker and for Eighteen Months previous to the first day of March last worked with Robert Wilson of Barbican London during which Period your Petitioner never made a Holiday but constantly worked at his Business and often over Hours in order to enable your Petitioner to support a Wife and Infant.
That on the first day of March last your Petitioner on his return from Fulham thro' Pal Mal his Attention was for a few Minutes taken up by the Nobility and Gentry going to Court and the Charity Children going to Saint James's Church and having got opposite to Carlton House your Petitioner was Collared by an African Black who your Petitioner has since been informed calls himself Thomas Bartlett.- That your Petitioner being supprized at such usage resented it and endeavoured to disengage himself from the said Bartlett which not readily doing your Petitioner struck or Pushed at the said Bartlett at the same time demanding the reason for such usage when the said Bartlett said you have my Watch upon which your Petitioner being searched and nothing being found your Petitioner expected he would be immediately discharged with an Apology for the Mistake but the said Bartlett changed the Charge and said your Petitioner had taken the Watch and given it to Two Men who were gone and your Petitioner having been carried before a Magistrate was Committed for Trial.
That your Petitioner being alarmed at the Charge Caused enquiry to be made of the Character of the said Thomas Bartlett when your Petitioner was informed that the said Bartlettt had been formerly a servant to Captain Bartlett about Seven or Eight years ago whose service he had been dismissed for some misconduct and had never since had any lawful employment but owed his support by Pilfering and Cohabiting with a woman of the Town in a Garrett in a Court near Maiden Lane in the Strand but what gave your Petitioner most serious Concern was to hear that the said Bartlett associated with the runners at Bow Street.
That your petitioner had no other way of resi[s]ting or Answering the said Charge than the improbability of Persons standing in a place surrounded with Constables and Guards and at Noon Day, the situation of the Prosecutor and your Petitioner's Character for Sobriety and Industry.
That your Petitioner employed an Attorney who delivered a Brief or Instructions to a very eminent Council on whose ingenuity your Petitioner relied for his Acquittal but by some Negligence the Gentleman had no intimation of your Petitioner's Trial and your Petitioner left undefended.
That your Petitioner altho' Born in London was never in a Court of Justice before the 29th day of Marchand upon your Petitioner being Carried into Court he was so intimidated that he Could neither Attend to the Evidence or give the least Instructions to the Court to Cross Examine the Prosecutor as to his Character and Situation and reason for being in Pal Mal on that Day and his means of Support and had he been properly [?sifted] it would have appeared that in Place of being in Captain Bartlett's Service he had not been for Seven years nor has he ever since his Dismission from the Captains Service been in any lawful employment whatsoever nor doth your Petitioner believe the Prosecutor had on the first of March a Watch of any sort on the Contrary he had all the Appearance of the most Abject Poverty and wretchedness and so Dirty that no Gentleman would retain him in his Service.
That your Petitioner was informed that the Court was much Prejudiced against your Petitioner on Account of supposed Blows given the Prosecutor but the Prosecutor has three times the strength of your Petitioner your Petitioner being so small and weakly that the severest blow he could give would do no material Injury to the most Feeble far less to a hardy African Black enured from his Infancy to Severity. Under the strongest impression of your Petitioners Guilt the Court pronounced Judgment on your Petitioner to die And your Petitioner has for these Six Weeks past been confined in a solitary Cell under the most dreadful Apprehensions of suffering and was only released on Friday the tenth day of May from his solitary confinement to a confinement not to close or solitary but which is embittered by assurance that the condition of your Petitioners Life being spared is Perpetual Banishment, a Punishment almost equal to Death. In this situation your Petitioner again solemnly asserts his Innocence and in support of that your Petitioner has annexed affidavits of Persons who hath known your Petitioner from his Infancy and of a Person who hath known the Prosecutor for upwards of Six years and your Petitioner humbly hopes that as he was convicted upon the Single and unsupported Testimony of the Prosecutor without being heard in his Defence he will still be thought an object of further Mercy.

May it therefore please your Honour
Humanely to Interfere with his Majesty to
grant your Petitioner a Pardon.

And your Petitioner as in Duty bound shall ever
Pray
[signed] Joseph Laidman


Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville (April 28, 1742 – May 28, 1811) was a Scottish politician.
He was the fourth son of Robert Dundas, Lord Arniston, the elder (1685–1753), Lord President of the Court of Session, and was born at Edinburgh in 1742. He was educated at the Royal High School, Edinburgh, and the University of Edinburgh.
Becoming a member of the Faculty of Advocates in 1763, he soon acquired a leading position in the Scottish legal system; and he had the advantage of the success of his half-brother Robert (1713–1787), who had become Lord President of the Court of Session in 1760.
He became Solicitor General for Scotland in 1766; but after his appointment as Lord Advocate in 1775, he gradually relinquished his legal practice to devote his attention more exclusively to public affairs. In 1774 be was returned to the Parliament of Great Britain for Midlothian, and joined the party of Frederick North, Lord North; and notwithstanding his speaking Scots and ungraceful manner, he soon distinguished himself by his clear and argumentative speeches. His name appears in the 1776 minute book of the Poker Club.
After holding subordinate offices under William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne and William Pitt the Younger, he entered the cabinet in 1791 as secretary of state for the Home Department.
From 1794 to 1801 he was War Secretary under Pitt, his great friend. In 1802 he was elevated to the Peerage of the United Kingdom as Viscount Melville and Baron Dunira.
Under Pitt in 1804 he again entered office as First Lord of the Admiralty, when he introduced numerous improvements in the details of the department. Suspicion had arisen, however, as to the financial management of the Admiralty, of which Dundas had been treasurer between 1782 and 1800; in 1802 a commission of inquiry was appointed, which reported in 1805. The result was the impeachment of Dundas in 1806, on the initiative of Samuel Whitbread, for the misappropriation of public money; and though it ended in an acquittal, and nothing more than formal negligence lay against him, he never again held office. An earldom was offered in 1809 but declined.
He was friends with John Graves Simcoe, Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada. Simcoe named Dundas Street, Toronto, after him (now Ontario Provincial Highway 2 in southern Ontario), and the town of Dundas, Ontario, is also named after him. In 1792 Dundas County, Ontario, was named in his honour.
A monument to him, modelled on Trajan's Column in Rome, stands in the centre of St Andrew's Square, Edinburgh. Raised "by the voluntary contributions of the officers, petty officers, seamen and marines of these united kingdoms", it was designed in 1821 by William Burn, who was advised by Robert Stephenson after residents of the square expressed concern about the adequacy of the foundations to support a column of such height. A statue of Dundas was added to the top in 1828.
Spouses
Marriage27 Dec 1789, Finsbury, LND
Marr MemoSt Luke, Old Street
Misc. Notes
( The Year 1789 ) Page 93

No 164
Banns of Marriage between Joseph Laidman Batchelor. &
Rebecca Jane Goods Spinster
both of this Parish were published on the three Sundays underwritten :
That is to say, On Sunday, the 13.th of Dec.r Vincent Green Minis.r
On Sunday, the 20.th of December John Forbes Mintr
On Sunday, the 27.th of December John Forbes




Laidman&
Goods
Dec.r 28.th 1789
Banns

Joseph Laidman of this Parish Batchelor & Rebecca
Jane Goods of this Parish Spinster were married in
this Church by Banns this 27.th of Dec.r 1789
by me John Forbes [Minister]
this marriage was solemniz’d between us } J Laidman
} Rebecca Jane Goods
} her X mark
in the presence of { Samuel [illegible: Partg...]
{ E Dobson
Last Modified 12 Mar 2011Created 3 Jun 2012 using Reunion for Macintosh